Jacqueline Clayton

Compact

Above: Jacqueline Clayton, compact image (2002 - 2011). Carved face powder, porcelain, vintage face powder compacts; dimensions variable. Photograph: Silversalt

Tattoo Flash

Above: Jacqueline Clayton, Tattoo Flash (2011). Vitreous porcelain, underglaze and onglaze colour. Photograph: Michel Brouet

Fragile Dreams

Above: Jacqueline Clayton, Fragile Dreams (2010). Porcelain, face powder, porcelain, sugar paste, cryogenic trays, laboratory glass.

RED Objects Exhibition

Above: Jacqueline Clayton, Tattoo Flash (2011). Work in foreground at 'RED OBJECTS,' COFASpace, 2011. Photograph: Alison Groves

Hyperclay

Above: Jacqueline Clayton, Rilke and the Autoclave (2011). Porcelain, face powder, laboratory glassware, vintage laboratory hardware; variable dimensions. Photograph: Jacqueline Clayton

PROJECTS

Com/pact

Questioning the framing of gender

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Hyperclay

National Touring Exhibition surveying the work of 8 Australian artists selected for their experimental approach to the medium

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Tattoo Flash

Jacqueline Clayton applies 18th Century transfer printing techniques to 21st Century ceramic production

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Fragile Dreams

Jacqueline Clayton’s recent ceramics from Com/pact

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Industrial Technologies applied to Art/Design Practice

Jacqueline Clayton’s experimental ceramics

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As artist and ceramic designer, Jacqueline Clayton’s work spans disciplines and definitions of practice. Over the last two decades she has engaged questions on the role of objects in definitions of place and self, producing a range of installation based responses exhibited in Australia and overseas (Seven Australian Installation Artists; Artists in the House!; In[two]art; Hyperclay, etc.)

Her purchase of a state-of-the-art ceramic factory in 2006, however, saw her re-engagement with an earlier professional focus on ceramic technology and ceramic chemistry (e.g. United Nations Fund for Women and Australian Government [AIDAB] funding for the construction of earth buildings in tropical cyclone zones). Clayton’s current research is centred on the adaptation of specialised ceramic industrial equipment, processes, materials and technologies for one-off and limited-run production. Clayton connects these resources to the knowledge and skills more usually applied to specialist design and craft outcomes. The result is agile, flexible, small scale manufacture that benefits from the quality of ‘high end’ industrial processes and materials, but is highly responsive to customisation, variation and nuance. In addition, the approach supports sustainable production of ceramic objects that incorporate environmentally appropriate innovations in clay body formulation, firing and processes of production. Early outcomes were exhibited in Smartworks, curated by Grace Cochrane for the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney in 2007. More recent tableware designs resulting from the research include a series produced for Quay Restaurant, Sydney, using relatively low fired, fully vitrified porcelain exampling superior strength and durability but produced with a reduced energy input.

Jacqueline studied in Japan at Saga College, Kyoto and the National Art School, Sydney. She exhibits regularly in Australia and overseas, and contributes to a range of local and international publications.