Karina Clarke

Skittles

Above: Karina Clarke, It’s not just a game (2010).

Button Stool

Above: Karina Clarke, Button Stool (2003). Premium grade stainless steel (satin finish) molded polyethelene plastic seat.

Rouges Jewels

Above: Karina Clarke, Rouges Jewels (2007).

Stacking Stones

Above: Karina Clarke, Stacking Stones (2008).

Borealis Light

Above: Karina Clarke, Borealis Light (2007).

Button Stool

Above: Karina Clarke, Button Stool (2003). Premium grade stainless steel (satin finish) molded polyethelene plastic seat.

Rouges Jewels

Above: Karina Clarke, Rouges Jewels (2007).

PROJECTS

Skittles

It’s not just a game for designer Karina Clarke

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Stacking Stones

Pet memorial objects

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Rouges Jewels

Karina Clarke’s reflections on human patterns of behaviour in relation to the natural environment

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Button Stool

Karina Clarke’s small-scale production of seats and ceramic bowls

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Burial Bones

Karina Clarke’s memorial objects for pets

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Splinter Workshop

Wood furniture designs from both past and present Splinter Workshop members

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A practising designer working in the areas of contemporary furniture and object design, Karina Clarke explores the dialogues between design, craft, and manufacturing. For Clarke, the wide range of contexts in which design is situated demands sophisticated analysis of the collaboration required for the design to be developed, produced and delivered to the market place. Focused on defining design as a ‘dialogue’, Clarke creates works that explore the perceived value of objects at an emotional, physical, and spiritual level.

Her ideas are responses to social and cultural understandings of the world we inhabit. In order to investigate the complex and subjective relationship between the object and the viewer, Clarke recontextualises the object’s form or function to create a new meaning. The relationship between the object and the viewer becomes activated, and a new experience occurs – one in which the object appears slightly familiar but is understood differently according to its shifted context.

Karina Clarke is a senior lecturer in Design at the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales (COFA).